I assume that each artist does their work for a different reason, so I can only speak for myself. I paint to express, to explain, to share, to tell the stories of our lives. Sometimes those stories are happy, sometimes sad. They may be someone else’s story or certain paintings are my own catharsis of working through issues or feelings that come up for me.
Because of this inspiration and since my paintings are abstract, I can rarely reproduce the same painting twice. Although I have been asked ‘I really love this painting. Can you do it with more blue in it?’ The answer is always the same. I smile and share with those who ask this kind of question what inspires me and that the feelings present as I’m creating are one moment in time, rarely to be summoned at will. Then I ask more about their story. What’s going on with them. And offer to paint something similar but uniquely theirs. And finally, I offer my caveat, if they like it, they can buy it. If they don’t, it will just go into my inventory to be sold. It takes the pressure off both of us.
Telling stories comes naturally to me. I’m a rather intense person – always pondering something. Always thinking, then feeling. In these later years of my life, I am practicing not thinking. And although I’m not very good at it, this practice energizes me to return to my frenetic life with a peace that comforts and affords a bit of rest.

Promise to a Young Girl

Telling stories with my work allows me to stay connected throughout the process. It keeps me engaged and gives my passion for life an outlet. And whether it’s your story or mine that I’m telling, I often smile when I look at the finished work. After all, I enjoy a good story; don’t you?

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